Oscars Ceremony 2014

(Note – There is a slight problem with some of the line spacing on this page, RD)

Nominations
The Red Dragon’s Choice
Winners
Discussion
Ceremony Clips

Nominations

Best Motion Picture of the Year

American Hustle
Captain Phillips
Dallas Buyers Club
Gravity
Her
Nebraska
Philomena
12 Years a Slave
The Wolf of Wall Street

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role

Christian Bale (American Hustle)
Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf of Wall Street)
Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave)
Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role

 
Amy Adams (American Hustle)
Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
Judi Dench (Philomena)
Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)
 
Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role
 
Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)
Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
Michael Fassbender (12 Years a Slave)
Jonah Hill (The Wolf of Wall Street)
Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)
 
Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role
 
Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)
Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave)
Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
June Squibb (Nebraska)
 
Best Achievement in Directing
 
David O. Russell (American Hustle)
Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity)
Alexander Payne (Nebraska)
Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave)
Martin Scorsese (The Wolf of Wall Street)
 
Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen

American Hustle (Eric Warren Singer, David O. Russell)
Blue Jasmine (Woody Allen)
Dallas Buyers Club (Craig Borten, Melisa Wallack)
Her (Spike Jonze)
Nebraska (Bob Nelson)

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published

Before Midnight (Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke)
Captain Phillips (Billy Ray)
Philomena (Steve Coogan, Jeff Pope)
12 Years a Slave (John Ridley)
The Wolf of Wall Street (Terence Winter)

Best Animated Feature Film of the Year

The Croods (Chris Sanders, Kirk DeMicco, Kristine Belson)
Despicable Me 2 (Chris Renaud, Pierre Coffin, Chris Meledandri)
Ernest & Celestine (Benjamin Renner, Didier Brunner)
Frozen (Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, Peter Del Vecho)
The Wind Rises (Hayao Miyazaki, Toshio Suzuki)

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year

The Broken Circle Breakdown (Belgium)
The Great Beauty (Italy)
The Hunt (Denmark)
The Missing Picture (Cambodia)
Omar (Palestine)

Best Achievement in Cinematography

The Grandmaster (Philippe Le Sourd)
Gravity (Emmanuel Lubezki)
Inside Llewyn Davis (Bruno Delbonnel)
Nebraska (Phedon Papamichael)
Prisoners (Roger A. Deakins)

Best Achievement in Editing

American Hustle (Jay Cassidy, Crispin Struthers, Alan Baumgarten)
Captain Phillips (Christopher Rouse)
Dallas Buyers Club (John Mac McMurphy, Martin Pensa)
Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón, Mark Sanger)
12 Years a Slave (Joe Walker)

Best Achievement in Production Design

American Hustle (Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler)
Gravity (Andy Nicholson, Rosie Goodwin, Joanne Woollard)
The Great Gatsby (Catherine Martin, Beverley Dunn)
Her (K.K. Barrett, Gene Serdena)
12 Years a Slave (Adam Stockhausen, Alice Baker)

Best Achievement in Costume Design

American Hustle (Michael Wilkinson)
The Grandmaster (William Chang Suk Ping)
The Great Gatsby (Catherine Martin)
The Invisible Woman (Michael O’Connor)
12 Years a Slave (Patricia Norris)

Best Achievement in Makeup and Hairstyling

Dallas Buyers Club (Adruitha Lee, Robin Mathews)
Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (Stephen Prouty)
The Lone Ranger (Joel Harlow, Gloria Pasqua-Casny)

Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Score

The Book Thief (John Williams)
Gravity (Steven Price)
Her (William Butler, Owen Pallett)
Philomena (Alexandre Desplat)
Saving Mr. Banks (Thomas Newman)

Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song

Happy – Despicable Me 2
Let It Go – Frozen
The Moon Song – Her
Ordinary Love – Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Best Achievement in Sound Mixing

Captain Phillips (Chris Burdon, Mark Taylor, Mike Prestwood Smith, Chris Munro)
Gravity (Skip Lievsay, Niv Adiri, Christopher Benstead, Chris Munro)
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (Christopher Boyes, Michael Hedges, Michael   Semanick, Tony Johnson)
Inside Llewyn Davis (Skip Lievsay, Greg Orloff, Peter F. Kurland)
Lone Survivor (Andy Koyama, Beau Borders, David Brownlow)

Best Achievement in Sound Editing

All Is Lost (Steve Boeddeker, Richard Hymns)
Captain Phillips (Oliver Tarney)
Gravity (Glenn Freemantle)
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (Brent Burge, Chris Ward)
Lone Survivor (Wylie Stateman)

Best Achievement in Visual Effects

Gravity (Tim Webber, Chris Lawrence, Dave Shirk, Neil Corbould)
The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, Eric Reynolds)
Iron Man 3 (Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Erik Nash, Dan Sudick)
The Lone Ranger (Tim Alexander, Gary Brozenich, Edson Williams, John Frazier)
Star Trek Into Darkness (Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Ben Grossmann, Burt Dalton)

Best Documentary, Feature

The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer, Signe Byrge Sørensen)
Cutie and the Boxer (Zachary Heinzerling, Lydia Dean Pilcher)
Dirty Wars (Richard Rowley, Jeremy Scahill)
The Square (Jehane Noujaim, Karim Amer)
20 Feet from Stardom (Morgan Neville, Gil Friesen & Caitrin Rogers)

Best Documentary, Short Subject

CaveDigger (Jeffrey Karoff)
Facing Fear (Jason Cohen)
Karama Has No Walls (Sara Ishaq)
The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life (Malcolm Clarke, Nicholas Reed)
Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall (Edgar Barens)

Best Short Film, Animated

Feral (Daniel Sousa, Dan Golden)
Get a Horse! (Lauren MacMullan, Dorothy McKim)
Mr. Hublot (Laurent Witz, Alexandre Espigares)
Possessions (Shuhei Morita)
Room on the Broom (Max Lang, Jan Lachauer)

Best Short Film, Live Action

Aquel No Era Yo (That Wasn’t Me) (Esteban Crespo)
Avant Que De Tout Perdre (Just Before Losing Everything) (Xavier Legrand, Alexandre Gavras)
Helium (Anders Walter, Kim Magnusson)
Pitääkö Mun Kaikki Hoitaa? (Do I Have to Take Care of Everything?) (Selma Vilhunen, Kirsikka Saari)
The Voorman Problem (Mark Gill, Baldwin Li)

The Red Dragon’s Choice

Ah, the Oscars are upon us once more! My initial inclination is to denounce the entire thing, comparing artist’s work in a competitive context always kind of feels very wrong, but …. it can also be a lot of fun, so below I shall detail my own personal view on who ought to win in each of the main categories, for a year that was a very good one for cinema generally.

Best Film
12 Years a Slave
The Wolf of Wall StreetFor me Gravity sticks out like a sore thumb here, for all the others are really good films. In fact, I couldn’t pick just one winner from the lot – although Her and The Wolf of Wall Street might be slightly leading the pack for me, with American Hustle and 12 Years a Slave close behind.I just can’t understand why Gravity has done so well in the first place, never mind reaching poll position for best film and director. The people I’ve asked about the film thus far have delivered one verdict of ‘loved it, felt like I was in space, fantastic’, one of ‘I really enjoyed it, but I don’t think it should really get the big awards’, one for ‘I liked it but I didn’t see what all the fuss was about’, and one parallel to my own view of ‘what a pile of utter garbage’. Quite a spectrum then. I am tempted to say this happens a lot in the industry, a film gets enough hype and buzz surrounding it that even before people have seen it, it has divided some viewers into the camp that will automatically get their backs up at the hype and be extremely critical of it slightly hoping it will not deliver, and the rival camp of viewers that are happy to like something because everyone else does and it gives them something to talk about in common agreement.There is probably also an element at play of many people going to see the film based on the media buzz who aren’t regular cinema goers, and indeed may never have seen a film in 3D before, and for them the spectacle is accentuated to a degree, compared to someone who goes all the time and isn’t going to be so taken with simply the effects. In many ways the movie’s entirety is not only encapsulated by the trailer but so too its outcome, and in the years to come I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see its popularity decrease and it perhaps even ridiculed. Much has been said in applause of its visual qualities, with some validity, but at the same time is it really terribly difficult to make the heavens and the Earth from space look impressive? They are already the most impressive grand scale vistas in existence, and director Alfonso Cuarón has all but ruined them by constantly rotating his cameras to a nauseating degree, though if it does win best film it will find itself in good company with last year’s tragic victor ‘Argo’.


Best Actor
 

 

Christian Bale (American Hustle)
Bruce Dern (Nebraska)
Leonardo DiCaprio (The Wolf of Wall Street)
Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave)
Matthew McConaughey (Dallas Buyers Club)This is the most fiercely contested category this year – not only are all of these great performances but there were several more to choose from, such as Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips, Idris Elba in Mandela and Michael Douglas in Behind the Candelabra (although in the States this seems to be registered as a TV movie, despite the fact in the UK it was shown on the big-screen, which might explain why he’s not in here). I’d slightly separate Bruce Dern as his role simply wasn’t as captivating as the others, and I do still have reservations over McConaughey’s since he lost a dangerous amount of weight for the part and I’m not sure this is a good example to set (although he would be far from the first to win in such a fashion), but he has had so many great turns over the past couple of years that he quite possibly deserves this more than the others. Having said that, it is a bit off that DiCaprio has never won an Oscar, so it would be equally great to see him win. Bale and Ejiofor were both utterly convincing too, so this could really go to any of them.
Best Actress
Amy Adams (American Hustle)
Cate Blanchett (Blue Jasmine)
Sandra Bullock (Gravity)
Judi Dench (Philomena)
Meryl Streep (August: Osage County)Why in the name of all that is Holy is Emma Thompson for Saving Mr Banks not in here?! It’s a complete and utter outrage – indeed Streep expressed similar feelings to her friend Thompson when the nominations were revealed. Judi Dench shouldn’t be in here because, although she is very good in Philomena, her accent was all over the place and at this level should that really warrant a nomination for best actress of the year? Sandra Bullock – excuse me, was she nominated for Speed? No, so why is she up here for Gravity, where she actually had to do less acting and more screeching with her face barely visible for most of the film. Blanchett simply must win, and if she does it will be entirely merited, despite very good turns from her competitors Streep and Adams.
 
Other people agreeing Emma Thompson should have been nominated

Best Supporting Actor
Barkhad Abdi (Captain Phillips)
Bradley Cooper (American Hustle)
Michael Fassbender (12 Years a Slave)
Jonah Hill (The Wolf of Wall Street)
Jared Leto (Dallas Buyers Club)

Jared Leto is the favourite for this one, but I don’t think that’s really fair – Michael Fassbender blows him out of the water here. If the award was for starving yourself, then sure, give it to Leto – but Fassbender’s performance in no small way made 12 Years a Slave what it is. I really hope he gets it, though all the others have earned their nominations too.


Best Supporting Actress
Sally Hawkins (Blue Jasmine)
Jennifer Lawrence (American Hustle)
Lupita Nyong’o (12 Years a Slave)
Julia Roberts (August: Osage County)
June Squibb (Nebraska)

Tough one this, with Jennifer Lawrence’s ever surging popularity she will be difficult to beat, but Lupita Nyong’o just might do it. Everyone here was good, for me though it’s between Lawrence, Nyong’o and Roberts.


Best Director
David O. Russell (American Hustle)
Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity)
Alexander Payne (Nebraska)
Steve McQueen (12 Years a Slave)
Martin Scorsese (The Wolf of Wall Street)

I, once again, fail to understand what Alfonso Cuarón is doing up here. If any of the other four win then I’d say they deserve it, but for Cuarón I never believed any of the tension he was trying to create and, as with some other viewers, I did feel genuinely nauseous more than once. Some of the technical work that went on the film is probably worthy of note, but which department exactly? Certainly not directing, neither too those who worked on the robotics to create the appearance of the actors being in space – it never once felt realistic to me.

For the other categories I can’t see anything other than Frozen winning best animated film, although I’m surprised not to see Monsters University in there instead of Despicable Me 2, and maybe even Epic for that matter, and for best film in a foreign language I’m happy to see that not only did Blue is the Warmest Colour not make it in, but that The Hunt did.

 
Winners
 

Best Motion Picture of the Year

12 Years a Slave

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role

Matthew McConaughey for Dallas Buyers Club

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role

Cate Blanchett for Blue Jasmine

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role

Jared Leto for Dallas Buyers Club

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role

Lupita Nyong’o for 12 Years a Slave

Best Achievement in Directing

Alfonso Cuarón for Gravity

Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen

Spike Jonze for Her

Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published

John Ridley for 12 Years a Slave

Best Animated Feature Film of the Year

Frozen

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year

The Great Beauty

Best Achievement in Cinematography

Emmanuel Lubezki for Gravity

Best Achievement in Editing

Alfonso Cuarón & Mark Sanger for Gravity

Best Achievement in Production Design

Catherine Martin & Beverley Dunn for The Great Gatsby

Best Achievement in Costume Design

Catherine Martin for The Great Gatsby

Best Achievement in Makeup and Hairstyling

Adruitha Lee & Robin Mathews for Dallas Buyers Club

Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Score

Steven Price for Gravity

Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Song

Kristen Anderson-Lopez & Robert Lopez for Frozen‘s ‘Let It Go’

Best Achievement in Sound Mixing

Skip Lievsay, Niv Adiri, Christopher Benstead & Chris Munro for Gravity

Best Achievement in Sound Editing

Glenn Freemantle for Gravity

Best Achievement in Visual Effects

Timothy Webber, Chris Lawrence, David Shirk & Neil Corbould for Gravity

Best Documentary, Feature

20 Feet from Stardom

Best Documentary, Short Subject

The Lady In Number 6

Best Short Film, Animated

Mr Hublot

Best Short Film, Live Action

Helium

Honorary Awards

Each year several honorary awards are given out, and since 2009 this has been done at a separate event from the main ceremony called the Governors Awards ceremony. The following people were awarded this time around (despite the different award names, each comes in the form of an Oscar), clips of each follow in the section below :

Honorary Oscars : Angela Lansbury, Steve Martin & Piero Tosi
Gordon E. Sawyer Award : Peter Anderson
Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award : Angelina Jolie

Discussion

Overall a reasonably pleasant show, albeit lacking the strong comedy aspect that the likes of the wonderful Tina Fey and Amy Poehler were able to deliver at the Globes last year, it was remarkably packed full of nerves, fluffed lines and awkward responses to losing out. Ellen DeGeneres did quite a good job with a fairly non-offensive presentation and her successful attempt to create the most retweeted pic ever was a nice idea, giving birth to what is a pretty great photo. During one of the montages of different films there was a noticeably highlighted Mel Gibson giving a rousing battle speech during Braveheart – deliberate choice for Scottish independence referendum year? I expect so. There were a few other Scottish nods in there too, with last year’s best animated film winner Brave, Gerard Butler as Leonidas in 300, a couple of Bond moments, though these were admittedly much less conspicuous.

I hate seeing people nervous onstage, I always feel sorry for them, although I think when the most famous actors in the world suffer from it and make mistakes it does allow everyone else to feel a little better about themselves. Worst offender of the night was of course John Travolta’s infamous gaff when introducing Idina Menzel, who gave a wonderful performance of her song ‘Let it Go’ from Frozen, and I would hazard a guess that he just run out of breath and panicked slightly, so in the end her name bizarrely came out as ‘Adele Dahzim’. In fact, you can click here to have your very own name ‘Travoltified’.

Amusing to see the camera instantly cut to U2 in the audience when Jim Carrey made a joke about LSD, and equally nice to see the crowd give them such a warm reception when they sang their nominated song ‘Ordinary Love’. The director of the ceremony and the cameramen must have a lot of fun trying to catch interesting reactions throughout the night, like cutting to a somewhat unhappy looking Michael Fassbender and Barkhad Abdi just after Jared Leto’s victory for best supporting actor, and Sandra Bullock looking increasingly red faced and tearful when Cate Blanchett pipped her to the post for best actress, perhaps augmented by the Oscars placing her right in the middle of the front row. It’s difficult not to feel a little sorry for her, although to be fair she already has one and, really, if you deserved a nomination for best actress of the year you should at least be able to pull off gracious when you don’t win. I’m not sure I’ve ever seen her look better though, and the way her hair was styled looked perfect for the occasion.

I think Gravity’s Emmanuel Lubezki’s win for best cinematography was good to see, he almost certainly deserved it for his work on the film and he has also done some terrific work over the years on films like The Tree of Life and The New World as well as on Cuaron’s previous films. The simmering feud between 12 Years a Slave director Steve McQueen and screenwriter John Ridley was there to see – apparently Ridley refused to let McQueen share credit for the screenplay, which is really unfortunate given it’s such a successful film but it’s also impossible for anyone else to judge on the merits of the case, filmmaking is such a collaborative experience that such conflicts are sadly far from uncommon, thankfully there was no public fallout and maybe they’ll continue to work together in the future.

Possibly the oddest moment of the evening came once again from Jennifer Lawrence, who paused as she was about to announce the best actor nominees in order to chastise someone off to the side for laughing at her, but of course the audience had no idea who it was. Unfortunately, she was genuinely pissed off, although she tried to recover from it quickly, whether it was because she was secretly upset at losing out to Nyong’o for best supporting actress, or that she’d been highlighted by the host for also tripping up this year, this time on the red carpet, but whatever the reason it wasn’t exactly the most dignified thing to do in front of millions. As it turns out, the guilty party in the audience was Jared Leto who was simply laughing along with DeGeneres who, unbeknown to Lawrence, was making fun of her behind her back, no doubt referencing last year’s infamous trip once again. To compound the faux pas, Lawrence can be seen in the background of McConaughey’s best actor speech, still onstage, talking to someone else and not paying attention.

One of the saddest moment in the evening, asides from the obituary section, was when two of Hollywood’s legends appeared onstage to give presentations but both had noticeable difficulty – namely Sidney Poitier, presumably struggling through natural difficulties given his age, and Kim Novak, who clearly found it difficult to talk after having plastic surgery work done on her face, a bit horrific to watch given her timeless onscreen beauty – don’t do it people, ever, even shrinking with age into a hunchback is preferable to looking like an unnatural plastic, animated mannequin.

No one was hurried by music this time, which is nice – in fact at one point the conductor even halted the music briefly when one of the Oscar recipients thought of something else to say, and then thought better of it. Cate Blanchett’s mention of ‘Julia Roberts, hashtag Suck It’ was apparently a reference to something that happened at the bar but otherwise remains a mystery, and The Red Dragon also liked Jamie Foxx’s rendition of the theme tune to ‘Chariots of Fire’, partly because his own father was in the movie ….

Ceremony Clips

Announcement of the Nominations

Best Supporting Actor
Honorary Awards
Foreign Film
Supporting Actress
Director
Actress
Actor
Film

Announcement of the Nominations

 

Best Supporting Actor

Honorary Awards ;

Honorary Oscars : Angela Lansbury, Steve Martin & Piero Tosi
Gordon E. Sawyer Award : Peter Anderson
Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award : Angelina Jolie

Lansbury

Steve Martin

Piero Tosi

Peter Anderson

Angelina Jolie


Best Foreign Film

Best Supporting Actress

Best Director

Best Actress

Best Actor

Best Film

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